Going Greek: Poets visit Getty Villa for classical culture

Going Greek: Poets visit Getty Villa for classical culture
This section of wall or ceiling depicts Bacchus and Ariadne the way Roman painter Titian depicted them in his oil painting from the 1520s. The original work hangs in the British National Gallery in London.

This section of wall or ceiling depicts Bacchus and Ariadne the way Roman painter Titian depicted them in his oil painting from the 1520s. The original work hangs in the British National Gallery in London.

Grant Spicer
FOR THE QC

As the Fall semester kicks off, many first-year students are getting acquainted with the kinds of opportunities that the surrounding LA area can offer them. 

Students taking the Link-32 course for Music History got the pleasure of stepping back 2,500 years as they entered the Getty Villa in Malibu to view their annual showing of Euripides’ famed Greek play,  Iphigenia in Aulis. Dr . Holmes, Theatre Department Chair, weighed in on the positives of attending Iphigenia as a class, “The plays are presented in the amphitheatre and the Getty Villa offers two matinee performances when college students can see the play for free.  Many colleges from Southern California attend these matinees,” said Dr. Holmes.

 Iphigenia in Aulis is the story of Agamemnon, who sacrifices his daughter Iphigenia during the battle against Troy to calm the winds of the sea and save their honor. “I think it is a meaningful opportunity for students to see a live performance [of an old play] and to experience the memorable Getty Villa...  It is a story about having to make a decision when there is no easy choice,” said Dr. Holmes.

Euripides lived and worked throughout Greece as the author of 90 plays, only 19 of which have survived. Written during the last two years of his life, Iphigenia in Aulis stands as a triumph of the genre of tragedy for ametuer and connoisuers of theatre alike. “I really liked the trip to the Getty Villa,” said first-year Dillon Gutierez. “I was planning on going, but much later in the year. I really liked the museum and the gardens too.”

Iphigenia in Aulis is open to anyone who is passionate about seeing the origins of theatre, greek history, sculpture, and architecture, or even something different from the standard movie date. The play will be performed from Sep. 7 - 30 in the Getty Villa’s Barbara and Lawrence Fleischman Theater. For those not attending as a student, parking is $10 after 3 p.m.