Keeping it calm and cool at Coachella

Keeping it calm and cool at Coachella

Tori O’Campo
A&E EDITOR

Trigger warning! This piece mentions sexual assault.

Excitement has been building for one of the country’s most anticipated music and arts festivals that is taking place the next two weekends. However, while preparing for the festival, it is important to be aware of the harsher realities of the Coachella experience that are too often overlooked. From knowing your resources if you are in a dire situation, to staying hydrated, preparing to be safe for a festival is a must. 

Discussions of sexual assault at music festivals, specifically at Coachella, increased in spring of last year after Teen Vogue released an article inspired by the #MeToo movement that voiced the stories of women who attended Coachella 2018. The reporter interviewed 54 women, and, tragically, each one had a story of sexual assault to tell. In response to the concerns that arose from the article, Coachella is hosting a new program this year called “Every One,” named after the company’s belief that “everyone” deserves to be safe. 

The steps under this program include the staffing of safety ambassadors to provide services for those in distress throughout the grounds, and the inclusion of male, female, and all-gender restrooms in every restroom area. However, the main focus of the program is the “Every One” tent locations that will be available throughout the camping site and the festival grounds. Each tent will provide information about resources, and will also provide trained counselors if support or appropriate response is needed. 

“Every One” logos will be found outside of the tents, and are marked on ground maps as well. The Coachella website states that “persons of any gender identity or expression, sex, sexual orientation, race, religion, age or ability are welcome” to the festival, which is why they hope that Every One can make a difference in how their guests are treated. “It’s important for concert organizations to take more safety precautions because these festivals can be such large and chaotic events,” said third-year Priscilla Hernandez. “I think it will be effective because often at these events it’s hard to find staff or someone to help. I believe people will use these resources, or, at the very least, be deterred to engage in anything that will put people in danger with them around.”  

According to Our Music My Body, 92 percent of women and 30 percent of men have reported being sexually harassed or assaulted at festivals. Coachella asks their guests to do their part as well, with the obvious rules of being respectful, but especially holding one another accountable and reporting misconduct to information kiosks immediately. For more information about “Every One,” visit coachella.com/every-one.

Aside from what the company is doing, there are also many easy things you can do yourself to keep you and your friends safe. On your drive out, it is worth taking the time to talk to the group of people you are going with about each of your personal boundaries, and discuss what you are comfortable and uncomfortable with. That way, nothing gets lost in translation within the chaos of the festival crowds. Having a discussion like this is important to make sure that everyone is looking out for one another.

As for taking care of your physical health and safety, making sure to stay hydrated is an essential part of enjoying a festival. With the desert heat and three straight days of fun in the sun, it is very easy to slip into dehydration, which will drain your energy and possibly ruin your experience. Hydration shots or tablets are a great way to combat the dehydration and replenish the electrolytes that your body needs to carry you through the weekend. A hydration shot is a two ounce shot of minerals and electrolytes that is added to water in order to activate and aid your body’s ability to maintain hydration, and packs can be found at most 7-Eleven stores and various health and convenience stores. 

Increasing your intake of Vitamin C can also help you keep up your energy and decrease the impact of the inevitable post-Coachella cold. Both of these will help your body’s immune system continue working throughout the weekend and also help you recover throughout the following week.

The point of music and art festivals are to enjoy yourself, let go the stresses of the end of the semester, and experience a nearly carefree weekend filled with music, dancing, great food, and an overall beautiful atmosphere. Thankfully, Coachella is taking actions to make sure that the experience is a safe place for everyone, but it is also important to do your job to protect yourself by staying aware, and taking care of your body’s most basic physical necessities!







Every One logos will be found outside of the tents, and are marked on ground maps as well. The Coachella website states that “persons of any gender identity or expression, sex, sexual orientation, race, religion, age or ability are welcome” to the festival, which is why they hope that Every One can make a difference in how their guests are treated. “It’s important for concert organizations to take more safety precautions because these festivals can be such large and chaotic events,” said third-year Priscilla Hernandez. “I think it will be effective because often at these events it’s hard to find staff or someone to help. I believe people will use these resources, or at the very least be deterred to engage in anything that will put people in danger with them around.”  

According to Our Music My Body, 92 percent of women and 30 percent of men have reported being sexually harassed or assaulted at festivals. Coachella asks their guests to do their part as well, with the obvious rules of being respectful, but especially holding one another accountable and reporting misconduct to information kiosks immediately. For more information about Every One, visit coachella.com/every-one.

Aside from what the company is doing, there are also many easy things you can do yourself to keep you and your friends safe. On your drive out, it is worth taking the time to talk to the group of people you are going with about each of your personal boundaries, and discuss what you are comfortable and uncomfortable with. That way, nothing gets lost in translation within the chaos of the festival crowds. Having a discussion like this is important to make sure that everyone is looking out for one another.

As for taking care of your physical health and safety, making sure to stay hydrated is an essential part of enjoying a festival. With the desert heat and three straight days of fun in the sun, it is very easy to slip into dehydration, which will drain your energy and possibly ruin your experience. Hydration shots or tablets are a great way to combat the dehydration and replenish the electrolytes that your body needs to carry you through the weekend. An hydration shot is a two ounce shot of minerals and electrolytes that is added to water in order to active and aid your body’s ability to maintain hydration, and packs can be found at most 7-Eleven stores and various health and convenience stores. Increasing your intake of Vitamin C can also help you keep up your energy and decrease the impact of the inevitable post-Coachella cold. Both of these will help your body’s immune system continue working throughout the weekend and also help you recover throughout the following week.

The point of music and art festivals are to enjoy yourself, let go the stresses of the end of the semester, and experience a nearly carefree a weekend filled with music, dancing, great food, and an overall beautiful atmosphere. Thankfully, Coachella is taking actions to help see that the experience is a safe place for everyone, but it is also important to do your job to protect yourself by staying aware, and taking care of your body’s most basic physical necessities!

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Asst. Arts & Entertainment Editor