From punks to poets

When looking at the norms of what a writer is, authors, Allan MacDonell and Dean Kuipers are not what come to mind. MacDonell, with his soft gait, and a delicately placed bucket hat, reminiscent of his time spent at the forefront of the Los Angeles punk scene, and Kuipers, adorned in a forest green flannel and REI bought trail running shoes, are not what the average writer looks like, or even is. They’re nobody’s all-Americans. Apart from their physical appearances, MacDonell and Kuipers represent the alternative author, the ones who were not cultivated in the harsh reality of academia, but rather those who grew to success in an organic way, a hard earned manner.

Japan Day blossoms on campus

In celebration and promotion of the Japanese minor offered here on campus, students involved in the program have come together to host Japan Day. The event, which is taking place 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., Friday April 12 in the Upper Quad, is meant to get students interested in the minor, while also getting more students involved in the many on-campus organizations that work with Japanese and Japaneselanguage students. 

Japan Day blossoms on campus

Spotlighting Societies’ Bigs and Littles

One of the most well-known traditions associated with Societies is the concept of “Bigs and Littles.” As a non-Society member, it’s easy to assume that these titles are just placed on two people and the two people then assume the respective roles, but this is simply not true. The Big -Little dynamic is a relationship that allows one to grow in their leadership skills, teaches the importance of empathy and mutual respect, and builds a bond that lasts forever.

Spotlighting Societies’ Bigs and Littles

Impolite Society!

For many college students, the pressure to meet the standards of academia comes as an almost unattainable goal and can be disheartening to many. The English Department will be attempting to ease that pressure for authors and writers specifically next Monday with Impolite Society!, a lunch event focused on alternative paths to the writing life. The event, organized by Visiting Assistant Professor of English Joe Donnelly, will take place at 12:30 p.m. on April 15 on the first floor of the Wardman Library. 

What’s to come at CareerCon

The Weingart Center for Career and Professional Development will be holding its first CareerCon — a new addition to their Backpack to Briefcase and Straight Out of College series next week, April 8 — April 11.

What’s to come at CareerCon

Watch yourself, watch Us

To vastly oversimplify Jordan Peele’s sophomore directorial effort, Us is a film about: community — who is accepted and who is othered; communication or lack thereof; cultural perspectives, understanding that different societies may have different values; and connections, with family and society.

Watch yourself, watch Us

Cultivating culture

This week is Diverse Identities Week at Whittier College, organized by Diversity Council in collaboration with a few other clubs. The first event for this week was the Farmers Movement Speaker event, held on March 25 at 4:30 p.m. in the Office of Equity and Inclusion (OEI). It featured Fabian Garcia, a program director of the Forest Service.

Cultivating culture

Mexican author Sayak Valencia on “Capitalismo Gore”:

The department of Modern Languages and Literatures and the department of Global and Cultural Studies gathered students and visitors at the Garrett House on Tuesday night to hear a lecture by Mexican author and Professor of Cultural Studies at El Colegio de la Frontera Norte, Sayak Valencia, to discuss topics pertaining to transfeminism, the border, and contemporary violence. Her book, Capitalismo Gore or Gore Capitalism, was also brought up to give some reference to her arguments. The lecture was given in Spanish, but slides were presented in English to help non-Spanish speakers or readers follow along with her talk. “My research over the last decade has focused on the situated analysis of the phenomena linked to neoliberalism on the border and what we could call ‘economies of death,’ especially those linked to the death in Mexico — related to drug trafficking and organized crime as economic paradigms — but also as a cultural, social, political and aesthetic,” explained Valencia in her lecture.

Mexican author Sayak Valencia on “Capitalismo Gore”:

Society Spotlight: tips for new Society members

Now that you are a week into being a Society member, it is time to dive into the privileges and responsibilities that come with being in a society. One of the major perks and obligations as a Society member is the ability to hold a chair within your respective Society. All Societies are different but, as a new member, take your first couple of weeks as an active to shadow the different responsibilities that you may be interested in. Ask the current holders of the chair, and get more information about the position. 

Society Spotlight: tips for new Society members

Shabbat Shalom! Bringing Jewish traditions from home

A. J. Villalobos Hall was bright and full of happy, comfortable energy when the Jewish Student Union (JSU) and Religious Studies department’s Shabbat dinner began at 6 p.m. last Friday, March 8. There was a Bon Appètit-provided buffet of salad, rice pilaf, mushroom-stuffed chicken, and matso ball soup, all done in kosher style, that lined the back wall. White-clothed tables were spotted around the room, and an astonishing 53 students, faculty, and visitors surrounded them in contented jubilee. 

Shabbat Shalom! Bringing Jewish traditions from home

Give yourself a pep-chalk: Whittier College celebrates International Women’s Day

In honor of Women’s History Month, there are a series of events being held on campus. The Women’s Leadership Association (WLA) is hosting two of these events. There was a zine-making workshop March 13, and they are teaming up with the Thalian Society  for a panel about “Femme leaders of today and tomorrow” Thursday, March 14. 

Give yourself a pep-chalk: Whittier College celebrates International Women’s Day

Society Spotlight: What to know if you’re new

Hello new Society members! First, I want to say welcome and congratulations on making it to the other side. I know I can speak for all the Societies when I say we are so happy to have you and can’t wait to continue getting to know you and forming even tighter bonds. 

Society Spotlight:  What to know if you’re new

Spot the new menu on campus

The Spot is a staple of life on  the Whittier College campus. At any given time, one can find students crowded in there hanging out with friends and enjoying the food offered. Lunch hours are especially busy, with lines flooding into the connected Ettinger Lounge as students wait to grab a bite to eat between classes. 

Spot the new menu on campus

VPS rolls out Spanish Film Festival: Four years of cultural celebration

Whittier College’s Spanish Film Festival started on Feb. 10, 2016 with a screening of The Facilitator, “a political film about human rights” according to PRAGDAs website. That screening, along with others the club has put on, were funded by a grant from the PRAGDA Spanish Film Club. “At that time, I believe Video Production Services (VPS) was trying to venture into something new and unique, which is what the Spanish Film Festival really is,” offered Kelly Santos, president of VPS. “Cinema can be one of the most important tools in terms of gaining a cultural perspective. Here in the U.S., cinema often lacks in diversity. We want to celebrate films made by other cultures because of the informative and impactful visual experience they provide.” 

VPS rolls out Spanish Film Festival: Four years of cultural celebration

Discussing healthy sexuality: Students and Faculty perform the Vagina Monologues

Poets gathered in Villalobos Hall on Feb. 28 for the Vagina Monologues. The event was hosted by the Violence Intervention and Prevention Club (VIP). And 100 percent of admission fees were donated, according to the Student-L sent out by fourth-year Eryn Wells, “90 [percent] of the proceeds will be donated to Women in Prison, Detention Centers, and Formerly Incarcerated Women. 10 [percent] of the proceeds will be donated to the Spotlight Campaign: The Resistance.” 

Discussing healthy sexuality: Students and Faculty perform the Vagina Monologues

Exploring your pasta-bilities; Learning to cook at WC

The Whittier College Program Board and Food Recovery Network hosted the first ever Poet Pride Cooking Class this past Wednesday Feb. 27. The class was hosted by Bon Appétit and led by Executive Chef Frank Gurrol. Program Board advertised that during the course participants would learn how to make “house-made ricotta and ravioli with ground Impossible Meat with smoked tomato and local basil sauce.”

Exploring your pasta-bilities; Learning to cook at WC

Unmasking their fears; Daryl Davis dismantles the KKK

Daryl Davis is a blues musician, and an activist for race relations. As one of the Feinberg Lectures speakers, Davis gave a lecture about dismantling the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) — his book is titled Klan-destine Relationships, published in 1997. When first approaching the idea of confronting KKK members, the primary question in his head was: “Why do you hate me when you don’t even know me?”

Unmasking their fears; Daryl Davis dismantles the KKK

Celebrating Los Angeles’ Black History

Over time, Black History Month has served to appreciate generations before us and the struggles they have faced. There are education systems based solely on the Civil Rights Movement of the ‘60s, and countless museums dedicated to the artwork of African Americans throughout time. 

Celebrating Los Angeles’ Black History

Better late than never: Getting involved on campus Spring semester

For many, the start of Spring semester signifies resuming responsibilities and returning to routine. Students rarely break out of  “comfort-zones” well-established before February. These can consist of things like friend groups, study habits, clubs, organizations, etc. It often feels like anything you’ve missed out on first semester will just have to wait until next Fall. “Senioritis” kicks in regardless of what year you’re in, and all you want is to get through the next four months as quickly and smoothly as possible. It becomes easy to feel like you have already decided exactly what this semester would be like months ago, but if you’re looking for new opportunities or a fresh start, it is much easier to find one than you might believe.

Better late than never: Getting involved on campus Spring semester