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Don’t hide, show your pride

The view from the top of the Science & Learning Center is breathtaking on spring evenings, making it the perfect location for a hang-out, celebration, or even a mixer. Last Thursday, April 25, Whittier College’s own Transgender, Other-Identified, Bisexual, Gay, Lesbian, and Allies for Diversity (TOBGLAD) put together a mixer to initiate their proposed project: an LGBTQIA+ Center here in Whittier, an idea that came from Whittier Alumni, including Megan Hobza. 

Don’t hide, show your pride

From punks to poets

When looking at the norms of what a writer is, authors, Allan MacDonell and Dean Kuipers are not what come to mind. MacDonell, with his soft gait, and a delicately placed bucket hat, reminiscent of his time spent at the forefront of the Los Angeles punk scene, and Kuipers, adorned in a forest green flannel and REI bought trail running shoes, are not what the average writer looks like, or even is. They’re nobody’s all-Americans. Apart from their physical appearances, MacDonell and Kuipers represent the alternative author, the ones who were not cultivated in the harsh reality of academia, but rather those who grew to success in an organic way, a hard earned manner.

Vitaly works magic at the Shannon Center

Comedy, art, and magic are all on their way to Whittier, as Vitaly Beckman will soon take the stage at the Ruth B. Shannon Center of Performing Arts. Beckman is a well-known illusionist who has already amazed thousands of people, bringing art to life while also cracking jokes for his audiences. 

Vitaly works magic at the Shannon Center

Impolite Society!

For many college students, the pressure to meet the standards of academia comes as an almost unattainable goal and can be disheartening to many. The English Department will be attempting to ease that pressure for authors and writers specifically next Monday with Impolite Society!, a lunch event focused on alternative paths to the writing life. The event, organized by Visiting Assistant Professor of English Joe Donnelly, will take place at 12:30 p.m. on April 15 on the first floor of the Wardman Library. 

What’s to come at CareerCon

The Weingart Center for Career and Professional Development will be holding its first CareerCon — a new addition to their Backpack to Briefcase and Straight Out of College series next week, April 8 — April 11.

What’s to come at CareerCon

Cultivating culture

This week is Diverse Identities Week at Whittier College, organized by Diversity Council in collaboration with a few other clubs. The first event for this week was the Farmers Movement Speaker event, held on March 25 at 4:30 p.m. in the Office of Equity and Inclusion (OEI). It featured Fabian Garcia, a program director of the Forest Service.

Cultivating culture

Shabbat Shalom! Bringing Jewish traditions from home

A. J. Villalobos Hall was bright and full of happy, comfortable energy when the Jewish Student Union (JSU) and Religious Studies department’s Shabbat dinner began at 6 p.m. last Friday, March 8. There was a Bon Appètit-provided buffet of salad, rice pilaf, mushroom-stuffed chicken, and matso ball soup, all done in kosher style, that lined the back wall. White-clothed tables were spotted around the room, and an astonishing 53 students, faculty, and visitors surrounded them in contented jubilee. 

Shabbat Shalom! Bringing Jewish traditions from home

Discussing healthy sexuality: Students and Faculty perform the Vagina Monologues

Poets gathered in Villalobos Hall on Feb. 28 for the Vagina Monologues. The event was hosted by the Violence Intervention and Prevention Club (VIP). And 100 percent of admission fees were donated, according to the Student-L sent out by fourth-year Eryn Wells, “90 [percent] of the proceeds will be donated to Women in Prison, Detention Centers, and Formerly Incarcerated Women. 10 [percent] of the proceeds will be donated to the Spotlight Campaign: The Resistance.” 

Discussing healthy sexuality: Students and Faculty perform the Vagina Monologues

Unmasking their fears; Daryl Davis dismantles the KKK

Daryl Davis is a blues musician, and an activist for race relations. As one of the Feinberg Lectures speakers, Davis gave a lecture about dismantling the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) — his book is titled Klan-destine Relationships, published in 1997. When first approaching the idea of confronting KKK members, the primary question in his head was: “Why do you hate me when you don’t even know me?”

Unmasking their fears; Daryl Davis dismantles the KKK

Celebrating Los Angeles’ Black History

Over time, Black History Month has served to appreciate generations before us and the struggles they have faced. There are education systems based solely on the Civil Rights Movement of the ‘60s, and countless museums dedicated to the artwork of African Americans throughout time. 

Celebrating Los Angeles’ Black History

Prison to peace: a life in letters

Researcher for the Nelson Mandela Foundation and author Sahm Venter is visiting Whittier College to speak to students about living under apartheid, the life of Nelson Mandela, and the letters that Mandela wrote throughout his time in prison. On Tuesday, Feb. 12, she gave a talk based off the findings of her book, The Prison Letters of Nelson Mandela. Prior to the books release in July of 2018, little was known about Mandela’s private correspondances during his 27 year long prison sentence.

Prison to peace: a life in letters

Poets are nuts about their unofficial mascot

With Whittier College set to turn 132 years old this year, the oldest and smallest Poet on Campus, Friday the Squirrel, turned 135 this past Monday. Nestled safely in a display case on the first floor of the Wardman Library, Friday is often overlooked by most students, yet he holds a great significance to the history of the College. 

Poets are nuts about their unofficial mascot

President Oubré’s first semester as a Poet

As the Fall semester winds down, students begin to think of how they have grown and changed over the past few months. They might even think of all of their firsts that happened this Fall — their first time living on campus, first love, first time writing a 20 page paper.  However, students are not the only ones experiencing firsts at Whittier College; as this was President Linda Oubré’s  first semester as Whittier College’s president.  

President Oubré’s first semester as a Poet

Casting a creative light on prison reform

At the beginning of November, a group of art historians, activists, educators, and participants directly affected by incarceration gathered together for a three-day symposium, Envisioning the Role of Arts in Criminal Justice Reform Conference, which focused on how art and art-related programs can have a positive impact on prison reform. The conference was held jointly at the Milwaukee Art Museum and the Haggerty Museum of Art at Marquette University. Both institutions hosted art exhibitions by various artists that specifically addressed this issue.

Casting a creative light on prison reform

TOBGLAD takes on Trans Awarness Week

Individuals and organizations across the country will be observing Trans Awareness Week Nov. 12 – Nov. 19, 2018. According to glaad.com, “Transgender (Trans) Awareness Week is a time for transgender people and their allies to take action and bring attention to the community by educating the public and advancing advocacy around the issues of prejudice, discrimination, and violence that transgender people face.” It is a time for any and all non-cisgender folk to celebrate their identities, for those who can to show their support, and for those who do not know to learn about trans identities and trans-identifying people.

TOBGLAD takes on Trans Awarness Week

Strategies on staying safe during a shooting

It’s an unfortunate reality that in a country with loose gun control laws, mass shootings and active shooters releasing fire in public spheres have become increasingly common. The recent shooting in Thousand Oaks, Calif. marks mass shooting number 307 in the United States in 2018; this puts us only a few days short of one mass shooting every day this year according to USA Today. In the U.S., death by gunshot is the statistically the most likely way to die. According to Medium, approximately one in 63 students will find themselves in the midst of a school shooting. These statistics may be terrifying, but they are not meant to incite panic and chaos; rather, they are meant to sober up students and to have the College recognize the need for a plan of action in the case that one of the worst and most feared tragedies occurs. Though nothing can prepare a student for the trauma of witnessing a situation that only stricter gun laws can prevent, knowing how to stay safe and protect those around you can be the difference between life and death. 

Strategies on staying safe during a shooting

A moment of silence and reflection for those lost

On Oct. 24, two African Americans were gunned down in a Kroger parking lot in Kentucky, because of the color of their skin. The following Saturday, 11 Jewish Americans were slaughtered during Shabbat morning services at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh simply because of their religion. In response to these tragedies, Whittier College, staying true to Quaker values, hosted a community reflection, in which Poets were encouraged to share their emotions and thoughts. 

A moment of silence and reflection for those lost

Whittier College votes

Several things hold people back from voting by the time Election Day comes around. Anything, from losing interest or a sense of unimportance, to, sadly, voter suppression, have been known to prevent the vote of countless Americans in recent history. However, one factor that many seem to forget that does, indeed, hold people back is Election Day itself — particularly where it falls on the calendar. Election Day is held on the first Tuesday in the month of November or the first Tuesday after Nov 1. Unlike countries such as South Korea and Malaysia, Election Day is not a national holiday in the United States. Even here at Whittier College, our doors will still be open come Election Day, with many students and faculty having to balance school and voting on Nov. 6. 

Whittier College votes

Absentee is better than absent

In case you were not yet aware, we are only three weeks away from the midterm elections. While it seems like the tag of “most important election ever” gets thrown around seemingly every election cycle, few can argue the importance of Nov. 6 to our country’s immediate future. While most students will get to vote in their home polling place, many of us cannot simply get on a plane and fly across the country to place our vote. For the section of the student body from the other 37 states represented on campus, absentee ballots may be their first ever voting experience. So, what exactly is an absentee ballot, and what deadlines do students on campus have to meet in order for their vote to be counted?

Absentee is better than absent