campuslife

From L.A. to Whittier, diversity in our backyard

As a part of the first six-weeks of the Fall semester, the Office of Equity and Inclusion put together “A Day in L.A.,” highlighting art from diverse communities. The excursion consisted of visits to the Museum of Latin American Art (MOLAA), the Pacific Island Ethnic Art Museum (PIEAM), and the first annual Whittier Pride.

From L.A. to Whittier, diversity in our backyard

Carnival for all

Program Board ended the year on a high note with the Club and Org Carnival from 4:30 – 8 p.m. on April 25. The usually quiet North Lawn soon came to life when students flooded the area looking for some free and fun entertainment. Every student who attended was given a ticket voucher for the food trucks that were brought in for the event. The three food trucks present were The Habit Burger Grill, Jackfruit Café, and Kona Ice.

Carnival for all

Stitching together a supportive community

TW: Mentions of sexual assault

 

In honor of Sexual Assault Awareness month, Whittier College’s Violence Intervention Prevention (VIP) club and the Student Counseling Center hosted Whittier College’s own Denim Day on April 24. Denim Day was started by an organization called Peace Over Violence after the Italian Supreme Court overturned a woman’s sexual assault case in 1998 because they felt that the victim’s tight jeans implied consent. The day after, all the women in the Italian Parliament wore jeans to show solidarity with the victim. 

Stitching together a supportive community

Society Spotlight: Countdown to commencement

As a fourth-year, I am so excited to finally have less than a month until graduation. It is a bittersweet time for fourth-years in Societies because we are not just graduating, we are leaving people we consider family and moving into alumni-hood. I spoke with a number of non-senior Society members, and here is what they had to say to and about their graduating members: 

Society Spotlight: Countdown to commencement

Don’t hide, show your pride

The view from the top of the Science & Learning Center is breathtaking on spring evenings, making it the perfect location for a hang-out, celebration, or even a mixer. Last Thursday, April 25, Whittier College’s own Transgender, Other-Identified, Bisexual, Gay, Lesbian, and Allies for Diversity (TOBGLAD) put together a mixer to initiate their proposed project: an LGBTQIA+ Center here in Whittier, an idea that came from Whittier Alumni, including Megan Hobza. 

Don’t hide, show your pride

Thinking and acting globally with Amer Rashid

Social Justice Coalition (SJC) put on Social Justice Week April 15 – 18, co-sponsored by the Associated Students of Whittier College ASWC, Program Board, the Office of Equity and Inclusion (OEI), and Heal Resist. A few of these events included a Spilling the Tea on Diversity:

Thinking and acting globally with Amer Rashid

From punks to poets

When looking at the norms of what a writer is, authors, Allan MacDonell and Dean Kuipers are not what come to mind. MacDonell, with his soft gait, and a delicately placed bucket hat, reminiscent of his time spent at the forefront of the Los Angeles punk scene, and Kuipers, adorned in a forest green flannel and REI bought trail running shoes, are not what the average writer looks like, or even is. They’re nobody’s all-Americans. Apart from their physical appearances, MacDonell and Kuipers represent the alternative author, the ones who were not cultivated in the harsh reality of academia, but rather those who grew to success in an organic way, a hard earned manner.

Japan Day blossoms on campus

In celebration and promotion of the Japanese minor offered here on campus, students involved in the program have come together to host Japan Day. The event, which is taking place 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., Friday April 12 in the Upper Quad, is meant to get students interested in the minor, while also getting more students involved in the many on-campus organizations that work with Japanese and Japaneselanguage students. 

Japan Day blossoms on campus

Impolite Society!

For many college students, the pressure to meet the standards of academia comes as an almost unattainable goal and can be disheartening to many. The English Department will be attempting to ease that pressure for authors and writers specifically next Monday with Impolite Society!, a lunch event focused on alternative paths to the writing life. The event, organized by Visiting Assistant Professor of English Joe Donnelly, will take place at 12:30 p.m. on April 15 on the first floor of the Wardman Library. 

Yoga in Uptown becoming a Local Fixture

Nestled on the peaceful corner of Bright Avenue and Bailey Street in Uptown Whittier, Local Fixture brings out the best of Uptown. In a statement from their website, Local Fixture can be described as “a family of Whittier locals who designed and curated an experience around the things we love. For us, it’s all about community, good coffee, and sharing our appreciation for fine goods. Come see for yourself and pay us a visit the next time you’re Uptown.” This indeed rings true. 

Yoga in Uptown becoming a Local Fixture

Poets are nuts about their unofficial mascot

With Whittier College set to turn 132 years old this year, the oldest and smallest Poet on Campus, Friday the Squirrel, turned 135 this past Monday. Nestled safely in a display case on the first floor of the Wardman Library, Friday is often overlooked by most students, yet he holds a great significance to the history of the College. 

Poets are nuts about their unofficial mascot

Society Spotlight: why I chose to be a ______

The reasons behind why an individual joins a society are just as unique as the individual. Each society offers something different, and it varies depending on what you as an individual are looking for.

I spoke with someone from each society to get their personal reasons on why they joined the society they did, and here is what they said:

Third-year Makayla Fredrick pledged into the Ionian Society in the Spring of 2018. When asked why she chose the Ionian Society, she said, “Saying I chose to be an Ionian simply because it felt right is an understatement. My reasoning behind wanting to be an Ionian isn’t as solid as ice, but instead fluid like a river. I wanted to be a member of an organization as rich in history and as diverse as the Ionians. Growing up as the only child my age in a male-dominated family, I didn’t have very many female role models, aside from my mother. Now, I have too many to count on one hand. It’s a commonly-known fact that you can’t pick your family, but I chose these women to become my family away from my family, and I continue to choose these women.”

Fourth-year Kieran Delceppo pledged into the Orthogonian Society in the Spring of 2016 because “that is where I felt the most at home. It is being with guys that want the best for you and have no problem shooting you straight.”

Fourth-year Jack Sinanian pledged into the William Penn Society in the Spring of 2016 . He said, “I chose to be a Penn because I wanted to be apart of a special group of people who wanted to be better versions of themselves everyday. I felt that if I could surround myself with a group of guys who wanted to achieve new heights for themselves and reach their goals, then they could help me just like I could help them and that I could emerge as a leader.”

Second-year Tom Santos chose to pledge into the Franklin Society in the spring of 2018, “because having met the members and getting to know them more, I felt like I could really relate with them and trust them.”

Third-year Genesis Gil pledged into the Metaphonian Society in the Spring of 2017. When asked her reasons for choosing to become a Met, she said, “Within the Metaphonian society I found a community of empowering women that I wanted to be a part of. They were so welcoming, and made my first semester of college memorable. When I was elected as [First-Year Class Council] president, they all texted me and congratulated me, and that kind of support was a reason why I chose to be a Met. Alongside that, they were always greeting me with smiles on campus and asking me how I’m doing. Their bonds as sisters was evidently strong, and I wanted to share that with them as well.”

Fourth-year Kindall Yeung pledged into the Thalian Society in the Spring of 2016 because of her previous relationship with the actives at the time. “I chose to be a Thalian because I knew, through meeting many of them and spending a lot of time with them, that they were my kind of people. We’re one of the most diverse groups on campus, and I loved that. I could see in the way they interacted that they had respect for each other, provided support for one another, and had a great relationship with their alumnae and with other societies on campus.”

Third-year Analis Hetter pledged into the Athenian Society in the Spring of 2018 after seeing how much the Athenian ladies motivated her. Hetter further explained, “I chose to surround myself with women that empowered me. I chose to build relationships with young women who motivated me and influenced me to become a better, stronger version of myself. I chose this sisterhood because of the mutual unconditional love that my sistAs offer. My sisters hold each other accountable to a higher standard and work unbelievably hard to live in harmony with everything they set their mind to. My sisters are the reason why I became an Athenian.”

Fourth-year Kelsey Sherman pledged into the Palmer Society in the Spring of 2017. Sherman said, “I chose to be a Palmer for multiple reasons. I wanted to find a new group of friends. I wanted connections. But I chose the Palmers because they were kind, they laughed at all my corny jokes, and they seemed to want to spend time with me. The Palmers reached out to me, went around my schedule to hang out with me, and were open to new ideas. Overall, I chose the Palmers because they were the best fit for me, and I knew that they would be able to give me the support I was looking for.”

Society Spotlight: why I chose to be a ______