Selections from the Whittier College Seniors’ Art & Visual Studies Exhibit

Senior Ashley Fuller offered a humanistic take on depictions of political figures such as Donald Trump and Hilary Clinton through her multi-dimensional acrylic paintings. 

Senior Ashley Fuller offered a humanistic take on depictions of political figures such as Donald Trump and Hilary Clinton through her multi-dimensional acrylic paintings. 

Senior Mario Almaraz drew inspiration for his pieces from his experiences of growing up in Lincoln Heights, an east L.A. community deeply affected by gentrification. “These are the faces of my family members and of those in the community,” Almaraz said. “I have seen how those ever-rising renting fees have put an emotional strain on my family and on those in my community.”  Also part of Alamraz’s work was a hanging sculpture of a large unscrolled document with words that read in bold, “Notice of eviction,” which mimicked the cursive writting on handwritten copies by those displaced families. 

Senior Mario Almaraz drew inspiration for his pieces from his experiences of growing up in Lincoln Heights, an east L.A. community deeply affected by gentrification. “These are the faces of my family members and of those in the community,” Almaraz said. “I have seen how those ever-rising renting fees have put an emotional strain on my family and on those in my community.”  Also part of Alamraz’s work was a hanging sculpture of a large unscrolled document with words that read in bold, “Notice of eviction,” which mimicked the cursive writting on handwritten copies by those displaced families. 

Senior Rachael Barron used warm pastel colors in her sketches of women constricting themselves through daily beauty and fashion regimens. “I drew my inspiration from feminist theories in which untying your ponytail is a freeing and liberating experience,” Barron said.

Senior Rachael Barron used warm pastel colors in her sketches of women constricting themselves through daily beauty and fashion regimens. “I drew my inspiration from feminist theories in which untying your ponytail is a freeing and liberating experience,” Barron said.

An oil painting of a man on a dirt bike with long shaggy hair and a beard unlocked a capsule of memories for senior and Studio Art major Dezi Donnersbach. “That’s my dad in the late ‘70s dirt bike riding in the Azusa mountains,” Donnersbach said. “I wanted to capture an old photo album that I found. Through these paintings, I am able to connect myself to his past.”

An oil painting of a man on a dirt bike with long shaggy hair and a beard unlocked a capsule of memories for senior and Studio Art major Dezi Donnersbach. “That’s my dad in the late ‘70s dirt bike riding in the Azusa mountains,” Donnersbach said. “I wanted to capture an old photo album that I found. Through these paintings, I am able to connect myself to his past.”

Senior Indigo Halverson’s photos of young women dressed as old fairy tale princesses put a twist on storybook tales using an objective reality: the fetishization of young women. Photographs depicted characters including Gretel, Snow White, Thumbelina, Rapunzel, and Little Red Riding Hood. 

Senior Indigo Halverson’s photos of young women dressed as old fairy tale princesses put a twist on storybook tales using an objective reality: the fetishization of young women. Photographs depicted characters including Gretel, Snow White, Thumbelina, Rapunzel, and Little Red Riding Hood. 

One of senior Sara Chiu’s intricate Chinese paper-cut creations was inspired by an old family photograph of two young Chinese baby dolls. “The bird of paradise flower in the back represents hope for them because my grandmother and her sister lived a hard life as farm workers in their village,” Chiu said. “They did not have the opportunity to have an education during those times of war, so they fled to America. That paradise flower foreshadows San Diego, where she found them again.” 

One of senior Sara Chiu’s intricate Chinese paper-cut creations was inspired by an old family photograph of two young Chinese baby dolls. “The bird of paradise flower in the back represents hope for them because my grandmother and her sister lived a hard life as farm workers in their village,” Chiu said. “They did not have the opportunity to have an education during those times of war, so they fled to America. That paradise flower foreshadows San Diego, where she found them again.”