City of Whittier ballot-in-brief

Madison White
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


KEY: 

(R) = Republican

(D) = Democrat

(N) = No party affiliation

(I) = Incumbent

CANDIDATE NAME (party, incumbent if applicable): Occupation


FEDERAL OFFICES

Governor: Oversees the state legislative bodies, signs policies into law, and acts as California’s Head of State.

JOHN H. COX (R): Businessman/Taxpayer Advocate   

GAVIN NEWSOM (D): Lieutenant Governor/Businessman

Lieutenant governor: Serves as acting governor in the case of governor’s absence, appoints representatives to state executive agencies and committees.

ED HERNANDEZ (D): State Senator/Businessman 

ELENI KOUNALAKIS (D): Businesswoman/Economic Advisor

Secretary of State: Oversees federal and state elections, campaign finance filings, corporate filings, and voter registration information. 

ALEX PADILLA (D, I): Secretary of State

MARK P. MEUSER (R): Election Law Attorney 

Controller: Acts as the state’s accountant and chief financial advisor.

KONSTANTINOS RODITIS (R): Businessman/CFO 

BETTY T. YEE (D, I): California State Controller 

Treasurer: Oversees state’s budget balances and surpluses.

GREG CONLON (R) Businessman/CPA 

FIONA MA: (D) CPA/Taxpayer Representative 

Attorney General: Ensures state laws are properly enforced.

STEVEN C. BAILEY (R): Retired California Judge

XAVIER BECERRA (D, I): Appointed Attorney General of the State of California 

Insurance Commissioner: Oversees insurance practices, regulates insurance pricing and availability.

RICARDO LARA (D): California Senator

STEVE POIZNER (N): Businessman/Non-Profit Director

Member of the Board of Equalization District 3: Collects fees and oversees tax administration for the state.

G. RICK MARSHALL (R): Chief Financial Officer 

TONY VAZQUEZ (D): Santa Monica City Councilman


STATE OFFICES

United States Senator: One of two elected officials representing the state in the U.S. Senate, a body of government that creates national legislation on everything from healthcare to tax reform.

DIANNE FEINSTEIN (D, I): United States Senator 

KEVIN DE LEON (D): California Senator 

United States Representative for the thirty eighth Congressional district: One of California’s 53 elected officials in the House of Representatives, a body of government that crafts bills on everything from gun control to immigration reform.

LINDA T. SÁNCHEZ (D, I): United States Representative 

RYAN DOWNING (R): Taxpayer Advocate 

State Senator: One of California’s 40 elected officials in the State Senate, a body of government that makes laws specific to the state.

BOB J. ARCHULETA (D): Mayor/Commissioner/Businessman

RITA TOPALIAN (R): Small Business Owner

Member of the State Assembly: One of 80 members of the State Assembly, a body of government which works to create legislation for the state.

IAN C. CALDERON (D, I): California State Assemblymember 

JESSICA MARTINEZ (R): Educator  


JUDICIAL APPOINTMENTS

Judicial candidates are non-partisan, and are elected off the basis of a “yes” or “no” vote. Judges are recommended by the state bar’s Commission on Judicial Nominee Evaluation to the governor. The governor appoints them to 12-year terms, and at the end of the governor’s term, judges must participate in yes/no elections to serve the remainder of their term under the new governor. This is done to prevent a governor from packing district and appellate courts with justices the public does not agree with at the end of their term. In this case, the following judges were appointed by Governor Jerry Brown (D).

JUDICIAL OFFICES

These seats are also non-partisan, but, unlike the judicial appointments, voters choose one of the two candidates for each office.

Judge of the Superior Court office 4: 

ALFRED A. COLETTA: Deputy District Attorney, County of Los Angeles 

A. VERÓNICA SAUCEDA: Superior Court Commissioner, County of Los Angeles 

Judge of the Superior Court office 16: 

PATRICIA (PATTI) HUNTER: Deputy City Attorney, City of Los Angeles

SYDNE JANE MICHEL: Senior Deputy City Prosecutor, City of Redondo Beach 

Judge of the Superior Court office 60: 

TONY J. CHO: Deputy District Attorney, County of Los Angeles 

HOLLY L. HANCOCK: Attorney at Law 

Judge of the Superior Court office 113:

MICHAEL P. RIBONS: Lawyer 

JAVIER PEREZ: Deputy District Attorney, County of Los Angeles 


SCHOOL DISTRICT OFFICES

Superintendent of Public Instruction: Chair of the California Board of Education (BOE), a public agency that ensures the BOE’s policies are being carried out. A non-partisan position.

MARSHALL TUCK: Schools Improvement Director  

TONY K. THURMOND: Educator/State Legislator 


COUNTY OFFICES

County Assessor: Determines how much an individual will pay in state property taxes in a given year.

JOHN “LOWER TAXES” LOEW: Los Angeles County Deputy Assessor

JEFFREY PRANG: Los Angeles County Assessor 

County Sheriff: Responsible for law enforcement on the county level.

ALEX VILLANUEVA: Sheriff’s Lieutenant, Los Angeles County

JIM MCDONNELL (I): Sheriff 


STATE BALLOT MEASURES:

Propositions are a “yes” or “no” vote. All descriptions come directly from voterguide.sos.ca.gov/propositions.


Proposition 1: AUTHORIZES BONDS TO FUND SPECIFIED HOUSING ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS. LEGISLATIVE STATUTE.

A YES ON PROP 1 MEANS: Allows the state to sell $4 billion in general obligation bonds to fund veterans and affordable housing.

A NO ON PROP 1 MEANS: The state could not sell $4 billion in general obligation bonds to fund veterans and affordable housing.


Proposition 2: AUTHORIZES BONDS TO FUND EXISTING HOUSING PROGRAM FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS. LEGISLATIVE STATUTE. 

A YES ON PROP 2 MEANS: The state could use existing county mental health funds to pay for housing for those with mental illness who are homeless.

A NO ON PROP 2 MEANS: The state’s ability to use existing county mental health funds to pay for housing for those with mental illness who are homeless would depend on future court decisions.


Proposition 3: AUTHORIZES BONDS TO FUND PROJECTS FOR WATER SUPPLY AND QUALITY, WATERSHED, FISH, WILDLIFE, WATER CONVEYANCE, AND GROUNDWATER SUSTAINABILITY AND STORAGE. INITIATIVE STATUTE. 

 A YES ON PROP 3 MEANS: The state could sell $8.9 billion in general obligation bonds to fund various water and environmental projects.

A NO ON PROP 3 MEANS: The state could not sell $8.9 billion in general obligation bonds to fund various water and environmental projects.


PROPOSITION 4: AUTHORIZES BONDS FUNDING CONSTRUCTION AT HOSPITALS PROVIDING CHILDREN’S HEALTH CARE. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

A YES ON PROP 4 MEANS:  The state could sell $1.5 billion in general obligation bonds for the construction, expansion, renovation, and equipping of certain hospitals that treat children.

A NO ON PROP 4 MEANS: The state could not sell the $1.5 billion in general obligation bonds proposed for these purposes.


PROPOSITION 5: CHANGES REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTAIN PROPERTY OWNERS TO TRANSFER THEIR PROPERTY TAX BASE TO REPLACEMENT PROPERTY. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AND STATUTE. 

A YES ON PROP 5 MEANS: All homeowners who are over 55 (or who meet other qualifications) would be eligible for property tax savings when they move to a different home.

A NO ON PROP 5 MEANS: Certain homeowners who are over 55 (or who meet other qualifications) would continue to be eligible for property tax savings when they move to a different home.


PROPOSITION 6: ELIMINATES CERTAIN ROAD REPAIR AND TRANSPORTATION FUNDING. REQUIRES CERTAIN FUEL TAXES AND VEHICLE FEES BE APPROVED BY THE ELECTORATE. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT

A YES ON PROP 6 MEANS: Fuel and vehicle taxes recently passed by the Legislature would be eliminated, which would reduce funding for highway and road maintenance and repairs, as well as transit programs. The Legislature would be required to get a majority of voters to approve new or increased state fuel and vehicle taxes in the future.

A NO ON PROP 6 MEANS: Fuel and vehicle taxes recently passed by the Legislature would continue to be in ewffect and pay for highway and road maintenance and repairs, as well as transit programs. The Legislature would continue not to need voter approval for new or increased state fuel and vehicle taxes in the future.


PROPOSITION 7: CONFORMS CALIFORNIA DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME TO FEDERAL LAW. ALLOWS LEGISLATURE TO CHANGE DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME PERIOD. LEGISLATIVE STATUTE.

A YES ON PROP 7 MEANS: The Legislature, with a two-thirds vote, could change daylight saving time if the change is allowed by the federal government. Absent any legislative change, California would maintain its current daylight saving time period (early March to early November).

A NO ON PROP 7 MEANS: California would maintain its current daylight saving time period.


PROPOSITION 8: REGULATES AMOUNTS OUTPATIENT KIDNEY DIALYSIS CLINICS CHARGE FOR DIALYSIS TREATMENT. INITIATIVE STATUTE. 

A YES ON PROP 8 MEANS: Kidney dialysis clinics would have their revenues limited by a formula and could be required to pay rebates to certain parties (primarily health insurance companies) that pay for dialysis treatment.

A NO ON PROP 8 MEANS:  Kidney dialysis clinics would not have their revenues limited by a formula and would not be required to pay rebates.


Proposition 9 was removed from the ballot by order of the California Supreme Court. 


PROPOSITION 10:  EXPANDS LOCAL GOVERNMENTS’ AUTHORITY TO ENACT RENT CONTROL ON RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

A YES ON PROP 10 MEANS: State law would not limit the kinds of rent control laws cities and counties could have.

A NO ON PROP 10 MEANS: State law would continue to limit the kinds of rent control laws cities and counties could have.


PROPOSITION 11: REQUIRES PRIVATE-SECTOR EMERGENCY AMBULANCE EMPLOYEES TO REMAIN ON-CALL DURING WORK BREAKS. ELIMINATES CERTAIN EMPLOYER LIABILITY. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

A YES ON PROP 11 MEANS: Private ambulance companies could continue their current practice of having emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics stay on-duty during their meal and rest breaks in order to respond to 911 calls. Private ambulance companies would attempt to reschedule meal and rest breaks that are interrupted by a 911 call.

A NO ON PROP 11 MEANS: Private ambulance companies would be subject to labor laws for this industry. Based on a recent court decision, these laws likely would require ambulance companies to provide EMTs and paramedics with off-duty meal and rest breaks that cannot be interrupted by a 911 call.


PROPOSITION 12: ESTABLISHES NEW STANDARDS FOR CONFINEMENT OF SPECIFIED FARM ANIMALS; BANS SALE OF NONCOMPLYING PRODUCTS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

A YES ON PROP 12 MEANS: There would be new minimum requirements on farmers to provide more space for egg-laying hens, breeding pigs, and calves raised for veal. California businesses would be banned from selling eggs or uncooked pork or veal that came from animals housed in ways that did not meet these requirements.

A NO ON PROP 12 MEANS: Current minimum space requirements for confining egg-laying hens, pregnant pigs, and calves raised for veal would continue to apply. Current ban on businesses in California selling eggs not meeting these space requirements for hens would remain in effect.


SCHOOL BOARD OFFICES

RIO HONDO COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT AREA 5 TRUSTEE: To read more about the RHCC District 5 race, visit TheQuakerCampus.org.


DISTRICT OFFICES:

CENTRAL BASIN MUNICIPAL WATER DISTRICT: Works to preserve, enhance, and restore the quality of California’s Water resources and drinking water.

BOB O. APODACA (I): Director, Central Basin Water Dist. 

ALEX RAUL MORALES: Professor/Consultant/Humanitarian 

MAX A. ORDONEZ: Businessman 

L. HILARY BARBA: Small Business Owner