Lose yourself in four years, find yourself in the gap

First-year me had everything mapped out. He was going to take his required classes, graduate in May 2019, then transfer over to Whittier College’s Master’s in Education Program for teaching. First-year me knew his right from his left; he knew exactly where he was going. Fourth-year me got lost three years ago and, at this point, he just wants to pull over and watch the clouds go by.

Lose yourself in four years, find yourself in the gap

I’m ambitious, not malicious

I should admit that I actually always get sorted into Slytherin or Hufflepuff. It is cannon that people can choose between houses. People are more complex than most books with a personality-based sorting system show — I’m looking at you, Divergent. And, as Harry chose Gryffindor over Slytherin, I chose Slytherin over Hufflepuff. 

I’m ambitious, not malicious

Students walk away from new art installation

I was really freaked out when I got an email from the college on March 25 telling me: “The Walkers Are Coming!” I’m not a huge fan of The Walking Dead, but I’ve seen and heard enough about the show to immediately think of zombies upon reading the rather urgent title of that email. 

Students walk away from new art installation

Letter to the editor regarding the Green New Deal

A new wave of liberal politicians have come out with a plan to help solve the global climate crisis. It is called the Green New Deal (GND). This is the new, ambitious plan to reform the American economy and reduce carbon emissions to zero in the near future. 

Letter to the editor regarding the Green New Deal

The art (or lack thereof) of the music biopic genre

Queen has been an important part of my musical library for as long as I can remember. Frontman Freddie Mercury has always held a cloud of ethereal and mysterious presence in my mind, and everytime I listen to A Night At The Opera, I listen with so much curiosity for the raw creativity that went into making an album that was so revolutionary for its time and has yet to be paralleled, even 44 years later. 

The art (or lack thereof) of the music biopic genre

The not-so-mysterious case of Jussie Smollet

Actor and LGBTQIA+ activist, Jussie Smollett, recently found himself in hot water when he became the forefront of national headlines. According to the New York Times, on Jan. 29, 2019, Smollett reported that he was assaulted by two men in all black. At the scene, Smollett claimed these men were shouting pro-“Make America Great Again” statements, coupled with racial and homophobic slurs. Along with verbally attacking Smollett, the men physically assaulted him by pouring a chemical substance on him and tying a rope around his neck. As the story came into the public’s eyes, many celebrities stood in solidarity with Smollett, as well as other minorities that are targets of this type of discrimination. 

The not-so-mysterious case of Jussie Smollet

Don’t diss my, or others’, disabilities

The Academy Awards aired on Feb. 24, and millions of people tuned in to watch. Social media platforms like Twitter were abuzz with responses to the different stars’ outfits, awards, and the lack of a host. One celebrity seemed to stand out — Selma Blair, known for roles like Legally Blonde, Cruel Intentions, and the Hellboy franchise. Her slicked-back blonde hair, pastel-and-black rainbow cocktail dress with matching cape, and a sleek black cane gave her an air of regality. The custom cane proved to be more than a fashion statement; it was there to aid her with her multiple sclerosis (MS). This was her first public appearance since her diagnosis in October. Two days after the Oscars, Blair had an exclusive interview about her diagnosis with Good Morning America. 

Don’t diss my, or others’, disabilities

Gotta catch’em all, for the eighth time

Grab your running shoes, backpack, and hat because we are going on a great Pokémon adventure to catch every single one of them. Game Freak and Pokémon leaked the first images of the newest game in the works, Pokémon Sword and Shield, on Pokémon Day 2019, which marks the anniversary of the first video game released on Feb. 27, 1996.

Gotta catch’em all, for the eighth time

The Twilight Zone reboot looks ap-Peele-ing

The trailer for the 2019 reboot of The Twilight Zone features a series of disconnected images of famous television actors stumbling around, sleepily mumbling lines in voice-over. Some of the images are immediately engaging: a fuzzy doll’s head washes up on the beach; a little boy rides a tricycle through the White House; Tracy Jordan vapes in reverse motion. Some of the lines are suitably creepy — “It’s all the same number. What
are the odds of that?” says Adam Scott. I have no idea what this means, but the line’s breathy delivery, coupled with string-heavy, ticking background music, give the trailer a kind of eerie poignancy. It is effective at setting a tone, and I am sure it offers plenty for YouTube’s cottage industry of professional speculators to pour over. But the ending tag, “only on CBS All Access,” is what sticks in my mind most. However good the show turns out to be, I wonder how many potential viewers will be put off by the paywall.

The Twilight Zone reboot looks ap-Peele-ing

To lockdown or not to lockdown — that was our question

As I left my room on Thursday, Feb. 21 to go downstairs for some breakfast, I saw helicopters flying close to campus, and could hear them saying things to the people below. I could not discern what they were saying, but it did not sound good. I was nervous and confused as to why Campus Safety had not sent anything if students were in danger. Still, I assumed I was fine and went on my merry way. Later on, as I was at the College Bookstore, I received a message from my friend saying that the school was supposed to be on lockdown and to stay indoors. 

To lockdown or not to lockdown — that was our question

The respect owed to “how can I help you?”

When I asked a customer to please place her items on the metal, T-shaped stand so that I could count the merchandise — a store policy I followed with every customer — the elderly woman held the articles close to her chest and asked me: “Why? It’s not like I’m going to steal them. That’s not in my culture.” She looked me  up and down, scoffed, and, as she left, I heard her call me a “dirty Mexican.” I inhaled; then, I exhaled, because that’s what you do in customer service. 

The respect owed to “how can I help you?”
fo2Madison WhiteGND, Opinions

The art of the Green New Deal

Climate change is a salient issue amongst Democrats. There is an environmental section as a part of the Democrat’s official party platform, and a poll conducted by Monmouth University in November found that 82 percent of Democrats believe climate change is a “very serious issue.” Although Republican voters and elected officials alike are coming around to the idea that climate change is a clear and present danger (64 percent of Republicans acknowledge climate change, up from 49 percent in 2015), the Democrats have championed themselves as, for lack of a better term, the Green Party. Yet, Democrats are shirking away from the Green New Deal (GND) legislation, put forth by freshman House of Representatives member Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) and junior Senator Ed Markey (D-MA) in early February. 

fo2Madison WhiteGND, Opinions
The art of the Green New Deal