The misconceptions of success

I have had a variety of perceptions of success throughout my life. I’ve thought of it as getting straight-As, graduating college, owning a business, having a lot of money, and just about every other cliché that you can think of. From the ages of 10 to 12, I thought you had to be famous to be successful. I thought that if I didn’t land myself a role as an actress on a show like iCarly or Victorious as soon as possible, then I could never be successful. Now, thankfully, I realize that this is not true. As a matter of fact, I’ve realized two things about success: it’s up to me to define it for myself, and I don’t have a time limit to achieve my goals.

The misconceptions of success

Ditch Netflix, go with DC Nation

Superhero fans across the world are mourning the cancelation of beloved titles Jessica Jones and Punisher. As nerds everywhere flock to their TVs and cry into their tissue boxes, I hope they choose to seek comfort not in reruns, but in a new love. Leave Netflix, Disney, and Marvel behind for a few days, and get a seven-day free trial of DC Nation to get caught up on Young Justice.

Ditch Netflix, go with DC Nation

No chilly reviews for Frozen 2 trailer

Disney is reaching  unparalleled levels of drama with its recent trailer for  Frozen 2, and everyone is thrilled. I’m sure that Frozen 2 is going to be one of the biggest hits of the year. Not only is the score absolutely, over-the-top amazing, but the animation technology has matured beyond recognition. It is easy to believe that the opening scene, which shows towering bluffs and dark waves crashing against the shore, may just be a repurposed National Geographic video. It was as if they simply photoshopped Elsa into a scene in order to take advantage of the nature. What is more impressive about this new trailer is what it conveys about this next installment of the Frozen series. It is going to be a much more dramatic film than the first;  this movie is most certainly a must-see.

No chilly reviews for Frozen 2 trailer

Click-bait conspiracy , One YouTubers ploy to get more subscribers

When I first heard about the Shane Dawson conspiracy theories on YouTube, I was full of wonder and anticipation. I watched so many of his videos as a kid; from his vlogs to challenge videos, I always knew if I clicked on a Dawson video I would be entertained.

Click-bait conspiracy , One YouTubers ploy to get more subscribers

Love your loved ones this Valentines Day

Whether it is a clever costume for Halloween or the perfect set of presents for Hannukah, I love celebrating holidays to their fullest extent; Valentine’s Day is no exception. Whether I am with someone or not, I love to spread the love on Valentine’s Day. There are very few times when it is appropriate to bake heart-shaped sugar cookies and pass them out to all of your friends or dress up in all red with sparkling, cupid-shaped sunglasses and bright red lipstick. Without Valentine’s Day, I would have to do these things completely unprompted and that might be, well, weird.

Love your loved ones this Valentines Day

So much for happily ever after

Look, I will be the first to admit that love can totally check all of the fairy-tale-boxes, but that in no way means that your relationship will be perfect. Sure, you should look for a partner(s) who will sweep you off of your feet. They should give you the kind of romance that leaves you smiling uncontrollably, but you can never expect them to be perfect all the time. It is simply unrealistic. Our society has sold an unhealthy image of relationships, and it is damaging our ability to experience and maintain love. Happily ever afters need to stop.

So much for happily ever after

Journalism changing, but never dead

When I tell people I’m majoring in English, their immediate response is to ask: ‘Do you want to be a teacher?’ and my answer has always been: ‘No, I would actually like to be a journalist.’ They’re either shocked and interested because few people choose journalism as a career interest early on, or they begin to tell me all the reasons I shouldn’t become a journalist (there aren’t enough job opportunities; it doesn’t pay well; the field is dying out; most news sources have moved to online platforms, etc.) — as if I hadn’t considered all those reasons before.

Journalism changing, but never dead

The golden lining of California

Beaches that go on for miles, towering viewpoints to see the beautiful sunsets, and Redwood Forests that can make your neck sore. California has quite the sights to see once you’ve been here long enough to enjoy them. Seeing what is usually only accesable to many through pictures and the media is really what makes it such a spectacle to the human eye.

The golden lining of California

Keeping religion and politics at the dinner table

“Hey Jesse, what do you think about Trump?” Always looking to stir the pot, my grandpa stared down my future brother-in-law, looking to make this Thanksgiving a bit more lively. The dining room table was a perfect physical manifestation of the political spectrum. Down on the left-hand side sat my step sister, her fiancé, my cousin, and her husband; then the more moderate-leaning individuals, including my brother and his girlfriend, sat in a central area of the table; and finally on the right-hand wing of the table sat my grandparents, my mom, step dad, dad, and step mom. My parents are by no means overly conservative, but compared to my sister and cousin, who are radically liberal, there seemed to be an extreme divide.

Keeping religion and politics at the dinner table

Grad school or bust, the student dilemma

Growing up, all I heard about was going to college and how it was going to transform my life. After making it through high school and finally reaching college, the pinnacle of success, I was disappointed to discover that I still had a long way to go.

Grad school or bust, the student dilemma

Fruits of American empire laid bare in Tijuana

Mexico’s northern border city of Tijuana was set ablaze by the recent arrival of the Central American exodus. Thousands of men, women, and children fled their volatile Northern Triangle homelands of Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador, determined to make the over 2,000-mile trek across dense Chiapan forests and vast Sonoran deserts to America’s doorstep — only to be met with the barbarism and state-sanctioned xenophobia, exemplified by barbed-wire barricades and tear gas canisters courtesy of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

Fruits of American empire laid bare in Tijuana

Bittersweet endings to bitter stories

“I saw [Amber] riding up and down . . . She was by herself. I saw this black pickup. He pulled up and grabbed her. When she screamed, I figured the police ought to know about it, so I called them,” said Jim Kevil to dfw.cbslocal.com. Kevil, a 78-year-old retired machinist, was the last person to see 9-year-old Amber Hagerman alive before she was kidnapped and murdered in Arlington, Texas.

Amber and her 5-year-old brother Ricky had decided on that day, Jan. 13, 1996, they would bike to a local abandoned grocery store and play in the parking lot.  They looped around the parking lot, breathing in the chilly winter air, until Ricky got tired and decided to head home. Amber stayed behind to ride around the parking lot some more. Minutes later, Amber was kidnapped. Kevil described her kidnapper as a white or hispanic male, 25 – 40 years old, under six feet tall, and of a medium build.

Bittersweet endings to bitter stories

Prolific has a new number

During the majority of the 1990s, an evil prowled the highways of Washington State. Gary Ridegway, known as the Green River Killer before he was caught, was picking up at-risk women and girls during his shifts as a truck driver, strangling them, and then dumping their bodies in the wilderness, only to come back and have intercourse with their corpses. The ’90s in Washington was a time for rebellion, punk music, and the rise of Nirvana, not the horror of discovering the bodies of young girls along the Green River, the dump site of Ridgeway’s first five victims. He had a tendency to prey on young girls, his youngest identified victim only 15 years-old. Her name was Debra Lorraine Estes. 

Prolific has a new number

A proposition to help our fellow earthlings

Animal welfare advocates throughout the nation rejoiced following the election on Nov. 6. What is being proclaimed as the “strongest animal protection law in history” by Mercy for Animals, Proposition 12 was passed with 61 percent of the vote by the citizens of California. Californians are paving the way for the continuing abolition of cruel factory farming practices.

A proposition to help our fellow earthlings

Exception funding exceptionally cut

College represents a period of intellectual transformation, wherein burgeoning young adults transition from the burdens and anxieties of pubescence to those of an ever evolving, often unforgiving professional world. On-campus employment can make this transition a bit smoother for students fortunate enough to receive a financial aid work award — the trouble, for some, can be finding work without one.

Exception funding exceptionally cut

Sex, Slut Shaming, and Small Schools

Whittier College is home to just under 1,700 students. One of them is sitting at a coffee shop in Uptown Whittier just a short walk from campus sipping a seven-dollar iced latte. Her lip gloss has ended up all over the beverage’s new straw less lid. She looks up at me with big brown eyes, accentuated with thick, long eyelashes.

Sex, Slut Shaming, and Small Schools

How a symbol sheds blood

Father Bede, a man whose work in introducing Christian Americans to Vedic concepts was instrumental, famously said that each religion is “a face of the one Truth, which manifests itself under different signs and symbols.” Signs and symbols: this overarching theme is vital to a discussion of faith-based violence; for the simple fact that it is these symbols that invoke animosity, fear, and, ultimately, violence. Two particular symbols – the Star of David of Judaism and the turban of Sikhism — have become crucial to inter-faith dialogue concerning violence prevention and the redirection of misguided information.

How a symbol sheds blood

Let’s give thanks for parachutes

“Once upon a time, there was an English archer named Robin Hood, who lived in Sherwood Forest in Nottinghamshire.” Thus begins an article found in the February 1972 issue of Air Line Pilot, the official journal of the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), a page of which is pinned in the closed Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) case file on D.B. Cooper. Just three months before, on Thanksgiving Eve of 1971, Cooper pulled off the only unsolved plane hijacking in aviation history. 

Let’s give thanks for parachutes

People of color come from all over the world

Recently, I’ve noticed a trend of people saying that Asian people are not “people of color” and should be considered “white.” I think this stems from the idea that some people view Asian people as the “model minority.” This is the idea that certain minorities, usually in reference to Asian-Americans, do better academically, socioeconomically, etc., than other minorities, and that other minorities should use them as a model to do better. 

People of color come from all over the world

JanTerm: to take or not to take?

It’s that time of year again, Poets; registration is upon us. There is one question that seems to be boggling a lot of our fellow students: whether or not to take a JanTerm. For those of you unfamiliar with the term, the College allows students to take one course between the Fall and Spring semesters, which is called JanTerm. During this time, Poets take a class that is usually three hours a day,  Monday through Friday. 

JanTerm: to take or not to take?

Celebrate the small stuff: an election recap

This Tuesday, Nov. 6 marked yet another historic election. According to ballotpedia.org, there were 35 Senate seats up for election, 9 of which were being defended by Republicans, while the rest were being defended by Democrats or Independent parties. 

Celebrate the small stuff: an election recap