opinions

Grad school or bust, the student dilemma

Growing up, all I heard about was going to college and how it was going to transform my life. After making it through high school and finally reaching college, the pinnacle of success, I was disappointed to discover that I still had a long way to go.

Grad school or bust, the student dilemma

Fruits of American empire laid bare in Tijuana

Mexico’s northern border city of Tijuana was set ablaze by the recent arrival of the Central American exodus. Thousands of men, women, and children fled their volatile Northern Triangle homelands of Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador, determined to make the over 2,000-mile trek across dense Chiapan forests and vast Sonoran deserts to America’s doorstep — only to be met with the barbarism and state-sanctioned xenophobia, exemplified by barbed-wire barricades and tear gas canisters courtesy of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

Fruits of American empire laid bare in Tijuana

How a symbol sheds blood

Father Bede, a man whose work in introducing Christian Americans to Vedic concepts was instrumental, famously said that each religion is “a face of the one Truth, which manifests itself under different signs and symbols.” Signs and symbols: this overarching theme is vital to a discussion of faith-based violence; for the simple fact that it is these symbols that invoke animosity, fear, and, ultimately, violence. Two particular symbols – the Star of David of Judaism and the turban of Sikhism — have become crucial to inter-faith dialogue concerning violence prevention and the redirection of misguided information.

How a symbol sheds blood

Let’s give thanks for parachutes

“Once upon a time, there was an English archer named Robin Hood, who lived in Sherwood Forest in Nottinghamshire.” Thus begins an article found in the February 1972 issue of Air Line Pilot, the official journal of the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), a page of which is pinned in the closed Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) case file on D.B. Cooper. Just three months before, on Thanksgiving Eve of 1971, Cooper pulled off the only unsolved plane hijacking in aviation history. 

Let’s give thanks for parachutes

People of color come from all over the world

Recently, I’ve noticed a trend of people saying that Asian people are not “people of color” and should be considered “white.” I think this stems from the idea that some people view Asian people as the “model minority.” This is the idea that certain minorities, usually in reference to Asian-Americans, do better academically, socioeconomically, etc., than other minorities, and that other minorities should use them as a model to do better. 

People of color come from all over the world

JanTerm: to take or not to take?

It’s that time of year again, Poets; registration is upon us. There is one question that seems to be boggling a lot of our fellow students: whether or not to take a JanTerm. For those of you unfamiliar with the term, the College allows students to take one course between the Fall and Spring semesters, which is called JanTerm. During this time, Poets take a class that is usually three hours a day,  Monday through Friday. 

JanTerm: to take or not to take?

Mars, the next home for humanity

The world is a rapidly growing place; so much so that human beings might be able to just pick up and move somewhere else. It has been talked about in what seems like every science fiction flick for the past 50 years, pondering questions such as: Are there aliens on Mars? 

Mars, the next home for humanity

Amelia Where-hart? Oh! Amelia There-hart

Where in the world is Amelia Earhart? Well, we may finally know. Just last week, Richard Jantz, researcher at the University of Tennessee, authored an article in the journal of Forensic Anthropology in which he supported the claim that bones found on Nikumaroro, an island in the Pacific, in 1940 belonged to the famed Amelia Earhart. 

Amelia Where-hart? Oh! Amelia There-hart